Category Archives: With Fabric

Winter Gifts: Lavender Scented Heatables

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Winter Gifts: Lavender Scented Heatables

Winter weather often inspires me to get crafty, because I spend more time indoors and holidays are my favorite part of the season. I love giving homemade gifts!

This year I was inspired by our chilly-ass office and one of our team members who wears a coat 24/7 indoors, to make these heatable packs as gifts. All you gotta do is pop it in the microwave and you have a nice little personal heater to warm you up. They are super easy to make, last a long time, and you can customize their size as much as you want. I have one that I made back in 2010 and it still works like a champ.

Things you will need:

  • Sewing machine
  • Uncooked rice
  • Dried lavender or lavender oil (or other scent you like – I mixed rosemary in with a few, you can get creative)

Note, these should not get wet! Wet rice turns into cooked rice…which is not what you want in your heatable.

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No-Sew Decorative Pillow

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Looking for a REALLY fast project?

I think we’ve all seen this pillow floating around on Pinterest and I wanted a cute pillow for my office futon chair. Last time I had a Joann Fabrics discount I got this awesome red and white chevron fabric just for this project.

Things you’ll need:

Fabric of your choice (I got 3/4 of a yard, and it wasn’t quite enough for the 12×16 pillow I had – the original tutorial says “fabric 3 times as wide plus a few more inches and twice as tall plus a few more inches as the pillow”). This is literally all you need.

Optional:

Embellishments (buttons, gems, whatever)

Hot glue gun

Safety pin

Elastic, basting tape, or other materials that can be tied

Things *I* needed because I don't read directions before starting a project.

Things *I* needed because I don’t read directions before starting a project.

Unfortunately, my fabric was a bit too short to actually tie into a knot. So I got inventive and used these jewels I cut off a pair of my (favorite) sandals that broke (sadface) last year. Since I want the cover to be washable- I drink a lot of coffee in that chair, and I really like to spill things- I used a safety pin to hold it closed, then hot glued my recycled shoe-gem onto some navy blue basting tape from my sewing box.

Reuse, recycle, you can handle it!

Reuse, recycle, you can handle it!

Then I just tied it in a knot and tucked it behind the safety pinned middle.

The long and short of this project is that you basically wrap the pillow as you would wrap a gift, but tie the long ends in a knot in the middle. That’s it!

Bam.

Bam.

Minimal Sewing: Recycle a Shirt

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We all have those shirts…the one you like and wear so much that your armpits destroy it. Right? Wait, that’s not just me is it?! I’m ashamed to share with you all that I have super pits that ruin everything.

I’ve had this Threadless shirt for awhile and I had it shoved into my closet because at some point about a year and a half ago it started to get that permanent armpit smell. Still, I couldn’t bring myself to trash it.

The no-sew workout tank is one of my most frequently viewed posts. This involves a smidge of sewing but it’s so simple you could even do it by hand if you don’t have a sewing machine!

Things you’ll need:

A shirt you want to salvage

Good (fabric) scissors

Pins

Sewing machine (or alternatively, just a needle and thread)

A safety pin

I originally saw this idea here: http://nichoward.typepad.com/my_weblog/2013/03/t-shirt-restyling-the-pinterest-way-again.html and was excited to make something less workout-ish.

Here’s my shirt:

shirt I refuse to toss

Why would you get rid of a zebra? You wouldn’t.

Cut off the sleeves, then cut across the top in a straight line. You should cut as close to the collar as you can so you have plenty of room to work with to create your casing for the straps. My design was a bit high up on the chest so part of the zebra’s ear got sewed through.

Snip snip

Snip snip

Cut the sergered edge off of your sleeves (the part where your arm comes out) in one whole strip each- this is what you will use for straps. Now thread one through the front and one through the back casings that you just sewed. Sorry, I’m getting rusty in my blogging and I didn’t photograph this part. Woops, I got lazy.

Attach a safety pin to the fabric you are threading into the shirt and use it to guide the fabric through.

Last, sew the straps together. I just did a zigzag stitch forward and backward several times where the strap ends meet.

I can show off the tattoo I got last month in all my DIY tanks!

I can show off the tattoo I got last month in all my DIY tanks!

Tada! A fun little summer weekend tank.

Spring Remix! Customized Dress Straps

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Well, it’s ALMOST Spring, anyways. I’ve had this dress of my friend’s sitting on my craft room desk since October.

You know the kind of dress I’m talking about. Those cute little summer dresses with the tie-able straps that seem like a good idea in theory, but once you wear it for more than 3 minutes in a dressing room, you realize how poor a design feature it really is:

I used to have this exact dress. Then I wore it once and immediately donated it.

I used to have this exact dress. Then I wore it once and immediately donated it. And now some other poor sap is stuck with it. Oops.

She asked me to do something with the dress so that it wouldn’t look lumpy under a cardi or jacket. So, I cut the ties off. Snip, snip.

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Cuddly Fleece Blanket

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Well, 2012 is almost at its end. Figured I’d squeeze in one last post before 2013 begins!

I wanted to make this fleece blanket for our niece- but I wanted to do something different, not the no-sew tied version- and I wanted to customize it with her initial. I was hoping to give it to her when we visited for Thanksgiving, but it wasn’t done yet, and even though I brought it along on the trip it still didn’t get finished. And then Christmas was here and it still wasn’t quite done. I suppose New Years was the kick I needed to finish it for good.  Can’t have this unfinished project hanging over my head. (We’ll just pretend this is the only half-finished project on my roster right now even though my bar is covered in seed beads and hot glue).

Hey, she’s only 2…she won’t mind getting a random present not on Christmas, right? Right.

Things you will need:

Fleece (I bought 2 yards. I think. It was awhile ago, obviously.)

Fat quarter of some cute coordinating print to use for the initial

Embroidery needle

Embroidery thread in coordinating color

Scissors

Blanket stitch.

Blanket stitch.

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Stenciled Shirts, Part 3: Testing Fabric Paint on Dri Fit

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Some friends of mine have marathons coming up and want to decorate their race shirts in memory of a loved one. But dri fit shirts aren’t exactly cheap, so I volunteered to test this out on an older, starting-to-get-too-big dri fit shirt of mine and report back.

There’s not much instructions to this. You’ll want fabric paint (I used Tulip brand), a stencil, paintbrush, and a piece of cardboard inside the shirt while you work.

Harder

You know you read this in song-mode. And now it’s stuck in your head.

You can see where I got a smudge on the shirt itself. Oops. I tried to get it out with nail polish remover but it didn’t work that well.

It’s worth noting that I do not have purple fabric paint- so I decided to take a chance and blended some regular purple paint in with white fabric paint I already had. Just sending up a hail Mary to the craft gods, hopefully it works alright!

Now to the main question…. can I wash it? and did the white fabric paint colored with regular paint actually work?

YES, and YES! So DIY fabric paint works on dri fit material, survives washing and drying, and if you have regular paint laying around and just want to buy white fabric paint you can color that fabric paint with any color regular pigmented paint you already have laying around, if you want to. . AWESOME.

Rawr

That’s my rawr face.

It also seems like a few of the smudges (I mentioned I tried to get them out with nail polish remover) seem to have disappeared in the wash/dry process. Nice.
I made another workout shirt on an athletic Tshirt I got at Target on clearance- in my favorite color! This one’s not dri fit though.

Beast

Yeah, that’s a thrift store bag in the background. Thrift stores are the gold mine of craft-aholics.

One of my friends commented how she wouldn’t want to be associated with the word beast. I think it’s complimentary. You don’t mess with a beast.

I’m ready to get my Nov. 3rd 5k on! And maybe even start New Rules of Weight Lifting for Women- which if you’re interested in strength training, I recommend you check out. I’m kind of obssesed with making fun workout clothes right now, which is probably a good thing because then I have to workout to justify spending so much time and energy on creating my own workout gear…

Stenciled Shirts, Part 2: Fabric Spray Paint Louisiana Outline

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Now that I’m getting my stenciling technique down (sort of), I decided to tackle a project I’ve wanted to do for some time. For our honeymoon (…in 2010) I made us matching baseball tees with our last name on the back. I never found a pre-made design I liked enough to put on the front, so the front has been plain. I had looked for Louisiana or fleur de lis decals I liked, but not much luck on ones that weren’t metallic and would be suitable for a male or a female.

Supplies:

You’ll need all the same stuff from my previous post for creating your stencil- cardstock, an exacto knife, cardboard to tape your outline to while you cut.

You’ll also need:

Fabric spray paint, or fabric paint and a paintbrush (I bought both…)

The shirt you want to work on

Double sided tape

LA Stencil

Tape your stencil down, and spray.

This time I made a Louisiana stencil, and cut a tiny heart out over the Baton Rouge area- where we met.

 I used my double sided tape from the beginning this time, especially because this stencil has so many tiny parts on the edges. You  will also want to make sure that if you’re doing any kind of cutout inside a stencil, you tape the edges very well there too to prevent the paint from bleeding.

Peel

Gently peel off your stencil. On my second go I lost a sliver of the southern coast that I peeled off with a fork without ruining anything.

Hubs

The husband likes his! Full disclosure: the small heart over Baton Rouge was actually his idea.

I’m pretty thrilled with how they turned out! You can see a few splotchy areas where it wasn’t totally even- just something to keep in mind if you use this Tulip fabric spray paint.

I legitimately woke up this morning thinking of new designs I could do on other shirts, combinations of fabric paint and bleach and who knows what else. More to come I’m sure.